What Do the Findings of Wired.com’s Article Mean for Frontpoint Customers?

Posted by , , at 2:55 pm

Post updated on 12/15/14 at 5:13 pm.

One of the founding principles of Frontpoint is the security of our customers. Earlier this week, Wired.com published a controversial article titled How Thieves Can Hack and Disable Your Home Alarm System.

The article has caught the attention of many in the industry, myself included. It’s also caught the eye of our customers, many of whom have turned to social media to ask the question: is my Frontpoint system safe from these sort of attacks?

We made a deliberate choice to use the highest quality equipment in the industry and we stand by the level of protection that it provides.

The equipment in a Frontpoint alarm system works differently than the equipment defeated as part of the study referenced.

We understand that the type of attack outlined in the article requires expensive equipment and tremendous patience from a criminal. We are doing further research with our strategic partners to better understand exactly how our system responds to this sort of attack.

Rest assured, we are confident that the equipment we use is the caliber and quality needed to give all of our customers the peace of mind they want, and deserve.

Update (12/15/14) – After further research and testing, we’ve confirmed that the additional layers of security in place do defend against this kind of attack. For the safety of our customers, we cannot disclose specifics on how this portion of our system functions. However, there are robust security measures built into the equipment we sell that would require a criminal to find alternate (and time consuming) methods in order to potentially hack or disable the system. We will continue to work with our partners to ensure that the technology we use performs when our customers need it the most.

Comments (2)

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  1. DotWhatever

    Unfortunate, but I guess it is a sign of the times. Everything gets dated. When I bought my system, I figured the sensors or the control panel had a fixed life (in my mind, 5 years). I’m at 2.5 right now. I suppose we all have to upgrade eventually (I actually only hope that pricey zwave devices remain supported or older sensors for those I choose not to replace). Curious as well to see how this plays out. For now, I feel covered. Next year or the year after?

  2. Jdk

    Appreciate the response, but this is really a non-answer. Can we expect a follow up after this additional research? What is the timeframe associated with the research? Thanks